Traveling to Turkey? 9 Useful Things to Know About Turkey

Traveling to Turkey? Here Is The Guide You Must Lookout Before Travel To Turkey

Merhaba, my fellow travelers! Are you planning to travel to turkey If you are planning to visit the beautiful country of Turkey, here are some useful travel tips and tips on the best things to know before you go to Turkey! Turkey is one of the world’s most visited countries, with 38 million visitors in 2018. And for a good reason; it’s safe, fun, comfortable, and cheap to travel to Turkey. Due to a lack of up-to-date online information, I went ahead and put together this travel blog to help others travel to Turkey. Hope you like this. Happy Traveling.

1. Know A Little Turkish Language

Excluding the major cities, not many people in Turkey speak English. But the good news is that Turkish isn’t hard to learn letters are similar to the Roman alphabet, and words are said to be written out. And, well, a little Turkish is going to get you far as you travel to turkey. When I went to buy shampoo on my first day, I used a few Turkish phrases, and the shopkeeper asked me for Turkish coffee. People have been generous and polite as I work through the words I know, even asking me to teach them English words. This kind of exchange will go a long way and make travel a little easier not to mention a lot more satisfying.

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2. Weather In Turkey

Of course, the weather depends on what part of Turkey you’re going to visit. As you travel to Turkey, it’s a vast land covering two continents with a varied topography. Turkey’s climate ranges from desert conditions to hot summers to cold, snowy winters. Northeast is generally cooler, the middle (near/west of Cappadocia) is hot/cold desert, and the Mediterranean region, like Istanbul, has hot summers and mild winters.

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3. Is Bargaining Acceptable in Turkey?

A women bargaining with shopkeeper

In Turkey, negotiating is just as much a social tradition as a business method, and almost anything on the market can be haggled down. The best way to get a fair price in one of Turkey’s many bazaars is to keep a smile on the whole transaction, to stay friendly, and not to let you know how much you want the object. If the vendor thinks that you’re not concerned about whether or not you’re buying the item, he or she’s going to bring the price down to tempt you. During your travel to turkey, if you notice that you’re haggling over a matter of pennies, the best practice is just to embrace a slightly higher price and leave with your item in tow, keeping everyone satisfied.

4. Dress Stylish and Respectfully

Leave the backpacker equipment at home women in Turkey wear highly stylish. There is also a wide variety of dresses: although some women wear headscarves and cover their hair, others wear short skirts and high heels.  Then how are you going to dress? Heels and formal clothes are usually appropriate, and if you want to fit in, you can also develop your style. During your travel to turkey, be sure to buy a scarf or shawl (I prefer Iznik tulip patterns because they’re useful and you can carry them home) if you’re in a conservative place, like the countryside, or if you’re invited to a mosque, where you’ll need to cover your hair.

5. Best Time to Visit Turkey

During your travel to turkey, you must know the best time for you to travel to make it awesome and unforgettable. Summer: can be extremely hot, reaching 100 F (38F) but still a lot of fun to go as long as you plan well for the sun. Carry UV parasols, sunscreen, and drink plenty of water. But there will be areas that feel intolerable between 12 p.m. and 5 p.m. in peak summertime, such as Ephesus and Cappadocia.

Winter: can be cold with snow In some areas. Low season tourism is from November to March.

Springtime: is beautiful as it’s all in full bloom, and it’s not as hot yet. This is perceived to be their high peak season (April & May).

Fall: is also an excellent time to go, but it is also a high peak season (September & October). The weather is temperate for much of Turkey at this time.

6. What is good to shop for in turkey

Turkey is a virtual cave of Aladdin. Known locally as Kapali Çarsi the Grand Bazaar in Istanbul’s Old City is a massive conglomeration of over 4000 shops, divided into areas specializing in gold, carpets, leather, souvenirs, and clothes. Turkish handicrafts include a wide range of textiles and embroideries, silver, onyx, and tile objects, mother-of-pearl, inlaid objects, leather, and suede items. Jewelry, carpets, and kilims are the best buyers in the bazaar. The Egyptian Spice Bazaar in Eminonu, near Istanbul, is a simple continuation from the Grand Bazaar or a decent starting point before going there. Here, you can buy a range of spices at a fraction of the rate you’d expect to pay back home. Pine kernels, peppercorns, genuine Iranian saffron, and other precious commodities are hawked here at knock-down prices! Real Turkish delight is also available to the tonne. Why not try the milk-based Turkish delight steeped in pistachio.

Markets and bazaars abound in other cities, too. You can visit the leather manufacturer and emporium during your stay in Turkey. Although the quality of some of the jackets and clothing at these locations is outstanding, the prices initially quoted may also be very exceptional. If you like a specific piece, it pays to haggle, even if you’re inside the limits of what looks like a smart emporium/showroom.

7. Understand The Culture

The West often mistakes turkey as a moderate Muslim state but it has always been a secular state with a Muslim minority. That means that religion and state are different and that most cities in Turkey are very liberal and give people a choice as to how they wish to follow Islam. Turkish culture has a strong emphasis on pride and honor, so it’s essential to make sure you know how to behave in such circumstances. There are little things, such as coping with direct remarks, welcoming six-course meals from your hosts, and getting used to the fusion of European and Asian influences. Be careful when you talk about politics: you should know which topics are sensitive and realize that every person would have a completely different viewpoint on culture, life, and government.

Observe, follow the lead of others, and check out a great blog called “Turkish Muse” that will help you get acquainted with being an ex-pat or a traveler in the region.

8. Food in Turkey & Turkish Cuisine

As you travel to turkey, Turkish cuisine is primarily inspired by Ottoman cuisine (Central Asian, Middle Eastern, Eastern European) and, of course, by the multitude of cultures and conquerors that have crossed its lands and the Silk Route. The primary flavors/ingredients used today are chilly red pepper, black pepper, mint, paprika, olive oil, cumin, and yogurt. One of the easiest ways to learn about Turkish food is by taking a cooking class. I did one with Colistin in Istanbul, and it was a HIGHLIGHT experiment (pictured above). I heard about the historical roots of Turkish cuisine, went shopping in the markets and stores in the local Turkish neighborhood, and then we made some of the most epically delicious Turkish dishes. Plates that are usually prepared at home because they need more detail and time. I mixed the spices and flavors that I could never have dreamed would yield such delicious meals. A cooking lesson in Turkey is a must-have cultural/food experience.

Note: Below these Turkish dishes, you must try.

Baklava, Dolma, Lokum (Turkish Delight), Kebap, Mercimek Koftesi, Corba Soup, Kunefe, Turkish Coffee.

9. Top Places to Visit in Turkey

If you’re planning a travvel to Turkey, check out this handy itinerary for the first time in Turkey. It includes the top places to visit, where to stay, and things to do in every town. Here are some of the most popular places to visit in Turkey:

1: Istanbul

2: Antalya

3: Izmir

4: Cappadocia

5: Marmaris

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